Eastern Mojave Buckwheat

Eriogonum fasciculatum var. polifolium

Buckwheats are a rarely used southwestern native perennial shrub. In my opinion, buckwheats are deserving of greater attention and landscape use for native plantings and landscape water conservation. The variety poliofolium is a small, dwarf selection with especially showy, pinkish-white flowers. Buckwheat shrubs are important pollinator plants for native bees.

ASU Public

Flowers: J F M A M J J A S O N D
Status: Native or Near Native
Origin: Commonly found on rocky south facing slopes of the Mojave, Sonoran, and Chihuahuan deserts at elevations ranging from 1000 to 4500 feet.
Family: Polygonaceae
Size:  18 inches tall x 2′ wide
Sun: Full
Watering: Supplemental only once established
Growth Rate: Slow
Soil: Tolerant
Temperature:
Pruning: Lightly head back buckwheat once every few years to thicken canopy cover and control shape.
Disease and Pests: Root rot pathogens in chronically wet or poorly-drained soil.
Uses: Special value to native bees. Host for the Bernardino Dotted-BlueLupine BlueMormon Metalmark, Behr’s MetalmarkNut-Brown Hairstreak, Ceraunus Blue, Rita Dotted Blue, Acmon Blue, Brown Elf
Notes: 

Resources